Politics of memory araujo ana lucia. Ana Lucia Araujo 2019-03-12

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Ana Lucia Araujo: Politics of Memory (PDF)

politics of memory araujo ana lucia

In this perspective, heritage is asocial construction, a set of visible objects invested by signification, which a society gives itself in a particular moment. Araujo is editor of the book series Slavery: Past and Present by. This project was sustained by Paulin Hountondji, philosopher and professor at Université Nationale du Bénin, who was president of the temporary international coordination committee and Minister of Culture. Several actors, most of them associated with Afro-Brazilian families, have developed different strategies to exploit the memory of slavery for their own benefits. Through the analysis of exhibitions, museums, monuments, accounts, and public performances, the volume makes sense of the political stakes involved in the phenomenon of memorialization of slavery and the slave trade in the public sphere.

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Politics of memory : making slavery visible in the public space

politics of memory araujo ana lucia

Each one has a bedroom and a large living room. The bed is made every day, as if he was still alive. Memory is plural and not static, it changes with time and is conditioned by the relationship between the individuals and the groups in a given society. Memory, however, is not just concerned with the past; it is also confronted in the present. It can be seen as a property which allows us to bring into the present an event that occurred in another time.

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Politics of Memory: Making Slavery Visible in the Public Space (Routledge Studies in Cultural History Book 17) eBook: Ana Lucia Araujo: centroespagnol.eu: Kindle Store

politics of memory araujo ana lucia

Slavery and slave trade in national narratives. Afro-Brazilian Heritage and Slavery in Rio de Janeiro Community Museums by Francine Saillant, Université Laval and Pedro Simonard, Université Laval 13. Exhibiting Slavery at the New-York Historical Society Kathleen Hulser 14. She is author of Romantisme tropical: l'aventure illustree d'un peintre francais au Bresil 2008 and Public Memory of Slavery: Victims and Perpetrators in the South Atlantic Laval 2010. Law, 'The Atlantic Slave Trade in local history writing in Ouidah Republic of Bénin ', 10. Afro-Brazilian Heritage and Slavery in Rio de Janeiro Community Museums Francine Saillant, Pedro Simonard 13. An official portrait of Brazilian President Luis Inácio Lula da Silva decorates the wall opposite the front entrance of the main living room.

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Ana Lucia Araujo: Politics of Memory (PDF)

politics of memory araujo ana lucia

The Art of Memory: SĂŁo Paulo's AfroBrasil Museum by Kimberly Cleveland, Georgia State University 12. From this point of view, memory is seen as a kind of oral archive, a representation of the past, of which one has to be suspicious rather than making and attempt to understand its mechanisms. This edited volume examines the recent transnational emergence of the public memory of slavery, shedding light on the work of memory produced by groups of individuals who are descendants of slaves. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2015. The man and the woman, who are dressed in occidental fashion, seem to come from North America.

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Political uses of memories of slavery in the Republic of Benin, by Ana Lucia Araujo, Universities of Laval and Ottawa

politics of memory araujo ana lucia

In December 1994, another conference was held in Ouidah to launch the project in Benin. Memory is constructed as a relation to the past, which is updated in the present. The spokesman also insisted on designating Francisco FĂ©lix de Souza as a 'merchant', without mentioning that he was a slave trader. The absence of panels with historical explanation in the places where the monuments are located does not help the visitor to learn more about slavery, the slave trade, or Vodun culture, but it sheds light on the existence of conflicting memories of slavery. Transnational Memory of Slave Merchants: Making the Perpetrators Visible in the Public Space by Ana Lucia Araujo, Howard University 2. At that time, public debates about slavery's past could not happen, because elementary freedoms did not exist. In a hierarchical scale, history would correspond to an official account, very often consensual and carrying truth, while memory would belong rather to the scope of imagination, fiction, construction, and would be close to the idea of lie.

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Politics of Memory: Making Slavery Visible in the Public Space by Ana Lucia Araujo

politics of memory araujo ana lucia

The Minister wanted Benin to lead the initiative, promoting the memory of slavery, but he argued that religion was not the most appropriate means to establish connections between Africans and its diaspora. Making Slavery Visible Again : The Nineteenth-Century Roots of a Revisionist Recovery in New England by Margot Minardi, Reed College 6. De Souza was a Brazilian slave merchant from Bahia who settled in the Bight of Benin in the beginning of the nineteenth century to work at the Portuguese fortress and to take part in the trans-Atlantic slave trade. International personalities of Afro-American culture such as Pierre Verger, James Brown, and the Brazilian composer and singer and current Minister of Culture Gilberto Gil, along with representatives of different authorities, went to Benin to participate to the launch of the festival. Possibly, one can argue that the memory of slavery here does not concern only the Brazilian slave merchant. The monument comprises a map of Africa with three bronze sculptures representing the mother receiving her son and daughter.

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Ana Lucia Araujo: Politics of Memory (PDF)

politics of memory araujo ana lucia

Photograph by Alessandra Brivio, 2005. According to Robin Law, even if these attempts to reconstruct and modernize the memory of Francisco Félix de Souza can be found in different publications about the de Souza family, some accounts of contemporary British travellers also report that the first Chacha considered himself a great philanthropist. The public memory of slavery and the Atlantic slave trade, which some years ago could be observed especially in North America, has slowly emerged into a transnational phenomenon now encompassing Europe, Africa, and Latin America, and even Asia — allowing the populations of African descent, organized groups, governments, non-governmental organizations and societies in these different regions to individually and collectively update and reconstruct the slave past. Photograph by the author, 2005. In contrast, memory is concerned with this relation to time.

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Ana Lucia Araujo

politics of memory araujo ana lucia

In 2015, the University of New Mexico Press published a different version of this book Brazil Through French Eyes: A Nineteenth-Century Artist in the Tropics. Through the analysis of exhibitions, museums, monuments, accounts, and public performances, the volume makes sense of the political stakes involved in the phenomenon of memorialization of slavery and the slave trade in the public sphere. As the head of the Kingdom of Dahomey, Prince Gakpe became King Ghézo and de Souza was rewarded for his help by being appointed to an official position in Ouidah, becoming the King's commercial agent in charge of selling slaves. This lively anthology from a new generation of commentators helps us peer into Pandora's Box with fresh eyes. The public memory of slavery and the Atlantic slave trade, which some years ago could be observed especially in North America, has slowly emerged into a transnational phenomenon now encompassing Europe, Africa, and Latin America, and even Asia — allowing the populations of African descent, organized groups, governments, non-governmental organizations and societies in these different regions to individually and collectively update and reconstruct the slave past. This impressive monument, designed and ornamented by the Beninese artist Fortuné Bandeira evokes the monumental Soviet aesthetics. During this period, a great number of slaves, especially Hausa and Yoruba people from this region, were deported to Bahia in Brazil.

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Politics of Memory

politics of memory araujo ana lucia

According to oral tradition, he gained this nickname because when he escaped from prison, the Dahomean guards asked the men who were transporting him what were they carrying and they answered 'a chacha', which means 'mats' See E. Museums and Sensitive Histories: The International Slavery Museum Richard Benjamin 11. This edited volume examines the recent transnational emergence of the public memory of slavery, shedding light on the work of memory produced by groups of individuals who are descendants of slaves. She is a member of the International Scientific Committee of the Slave Route Project. The articles included in this book are helpful for my ongoing research. The relations between the Kingdom of Dahomey and Brazil have been exhaustively studied, in different periods, by several authors and scholars such as Pierre Verger, J.

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