Reading obama kloppenberg james t. David Greenberg Reviews James T. Kloppenberg's 2019-01-24

Reading obama kloppenberg james t Rating: 5,5/10 1678 reviews

Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition

reading obama kloppenberg james t

In Reading Obama, James T. Klop­penberg sees Obama working from pragmatist philosopher Richard Bernstein's principle of fallibilism: all positions, however passionately held, are subject to correction when seen in a bigger context or examined from another point of view. It always means another battle, another conversation, ever-widening circles of participation and a bumpy road toward commonly shared goals. Among these, James Kloppenberg's intellectual contextualization stands out. In these years the academy was in intellectual ferment, and in many disciplines—literature and history, politics and law—pragmatism was enjoying a revival. Kloppenberg shows that Obama's positions on social justice, religion, race, family, and America's role in the world do not stem from a desire to please everyone but from deeply rooted--although currently unfashionable--convictions about how a democracy must deal with difference and conflict.

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Reading Obama by James T. Kloppenberg (ebook)

reading obama kloppenberg james t

He is driven by a belief that Americans can find common ground and work toward common solutions. Examining Obama's views on the Constitution, slavery and the Civil War, the New Deal, and the civil rights movement, Kloppenberg shows Obama's sophisticated understanding of American history. Derided by the Right as dangerous and by the Left as spineless, Barack Obama puzzles observers. In Reading Obama, James T. He's written a fine and hugely informative book. Think of Kloppenberg as the Bob Woodward of investigative philosophical analysis.

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Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition

reading obama kloppenberg james t

Obama's interest in compromise, reasoned public debate, and the patient nurturing of civility is a sign of strength, not weakness, Kloppenberg argues. Even while he does not agree with every Obama policy he is especially critical of his actions on the economy and Afghan­istan , Kloppenberg admires Obama's integration of these intellectual traditions. The case Kloppenberg makes is persuasive and, for anyone interested in the larger context of Obama's thinking, he demonstrates that this serious man is a rarity. Think of Kloppenberg as the Bob Woodward of investigative philosophical analysis. As a result of Obama's connections with Harvard and the University of Chicago, Kloppenberg feels entitled to connect Obama with James and Dewey and American pragmatist philosophy.

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Reading Obama Audiobook by James Kloppenberg

reading obama kloppenberg james t

Reading Obama reveals the sources of Obama's commitment to democratic deliberation: the books he has read, the visionaries who have inspired him, the social movements and personal struggles that have shaped his thinking. What cause has not at some point expediently—or should we say pragmatically? Kloppenberg is best when he analyzes Obama's own writing--Dreams from My Father, The Audacity of Hope, and some of his memorable speeches. Kloppenberg uses Obama's now famous 2006 speech on religion and the Democratic Party as an example. Obama's commitments to deliberation and experimentation derive from sustained engagement with American democratic thought. Kloppenberg does not engage in overt political partisanship in his book, but his nearly unmitigated praise for Obama can be cloying. He gives an excellent analysis of Obama's views of Lincoln and of the ways in which he has come to terms with race.

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David Greenberg Reviews James T. Kloppenberg's

reading obama kloppenberg james t

This is a form of philosophical pragmatism that is essential to democracy. New York Review of Books Review This is an assessment of Obama that will make sense to those who championed his rise to the presidency but who now have reservations about the way he is executing the role. He spent 2008, the election year, at the University of Cambridge in England and found himself in lecture halls and at dinner tables trying to explain who this man was. Kloppenberg demonstrates the influences that have shaped Obama's distinctive worldview, including Nietzsche and Niebuhr, Ellison and Rawls, and recent theorists engaged in debates about feminism, critical race theory, and cultural norms. Kloppenberg provides an excellent summary of the pragmatic tradition--a tradition rooted in the belief that there are no eternal truths, that all ideas and convictions must meet the test of usefulness.

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Reading Obama by James T. Kloppenberg (ebook)

reading obama kloppenberg james t

Kloppenberg's own endeavor, in surveying the work in political and legal theory that seems to have shaped President Obama's thinking, is to argue for the coherence, the Americanness, and the plausibility of Obama's approach to politics and to the Constitution. Obama's interest in compromise, reasoned public debate, and the patient nurturing of civility is a sign of strength, not weakness, Kloppenberg argues. Kloppenberg provides an excellent summary of the pragmatic tradition--a tradition rooted in the belief that there are no eternal truths, that all ideas and convictions must meet the test of usefulness. Kloppenberg began his study of Obama as an intellectual and political philosopher while lecturing at Cambridge University, and his engagement with European interpretations of Obama adds a fascinating counterpoint to his reading of American political traditions. If we were to follow Aristotle's rules of logic in a syllogism, then the conclusion of our syllogism would be a certitude, according to Aristotle's way of thinking about logic. Those who find Obama puzzling need only study the books he read as a student, look at writings by his professors, and read his academic and autobiographical writings to understand what he thinks, why he thinks the way he does and how his presidency reflects the intellectual conclusions he has drawn from his education and life experiences. Kloppenberg's own endeavor, in surveying the work in political and legal theory that seems to have shaped President Obama's thinking, is to argue for the coherence, the Americanness, and the plausibility of Obama's approach to politics and to the Constitution.

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Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition

reading obama kloppenberg james t

Kloppenberg shows that Obama's positions on social justice, religion, race, family, and America's role in the world do not stem from a desire to please everyone but from deeply rooted--although currently unfashionable--convictions about how a democracy must deal with difference and conflict. Briefly stated, Kloppenberg thinks that the spirit of American pragmatist philosophy is the spirit that liberals today should embrace in order to fight the good fight against conservatives. . In my estimate, Obama has not excelled in explaining his own decisions. Their jobs are different and they think differently. Rodgers, Princeton University In this arresting, highly informative book, Kloppenberg shows how Obama was shaped by the intellectual debates of the 1980s and is thus the first president since Woodrow Wilson to deeply absorb and act upon the most sophisticated social theories of his generation.

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Reading Obama

reading obama kloppenberg james t

Thus Obama believes that there are no final solutions or absolute truths in democratic politics. Kwame Anthony Appiah Review One of Kloppenberg's most important claims is that Obama embodies the spirit of pragmatism--not the colloquial pragmatism that is more or less the same thing as practicality, but the philosophical pragmatism that emerged largely from William James and John Dewey and continued to flourish through the work of Richard Rorty, Hilary Putnam, and others. T in English 1968; Ph. He locates its roots in Madison, Lincoln, and especially in the philosophical pragmatism of William James and John Dewey, which nourished generations of American progressives, black and white, female and male, through much of the twentieth century, albeit with mixed results. Examining Obama's views on the Constitution, slavery and the Civil War, the New Deal, and the civil rights movement, Kloppenberg shows Obama's sophisticated understanding of American history. The chief works, of course, are Obama's best-selling books--his semi-fictional memoir, Dreams from My Father, and his campaign trial balloon, The Audacity of Hope; but Kloppenberg also draws on a passel of other writings and, most originally, on the issues of the Harvard Law Review over which Obama presided as editor in 1990.

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Kloppenberg, J.: Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition (Hardcover)

reading obama kloppenberg james t

Kloppenberg provides an excellent summary of the pragmatic tradition--a tradition rooted in the belief that there are no eternal truths, that all ideas and convictions must meet the test of usefulness. Reading Obama shows the powerful impact on Obama's politics of his engagement with the late twentieth century revival of philosophical pragmatism and civic republicanism. He gives an excellent analysis of Obama's views of Lincoln and of the ways in which he has come to terms with race. In this speech, Obama points out that Democrats and religious people share a great deal and that by seeking common ground, they can work to accomplish shared goals. Obama's interest in compromise, reasoned public debate, and the patient nurturing of civility is a sign of strength, not weakness, Kloppenberg argues. Kloppenberg is best when he analyzes Obama's own writing--Dreams from My Father, The Audacity of Hope, and some of his memorable speeches. This is a fine example of contemporary intellectual history.

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Reading Obama, by James T. Kloppenberg

reading obama kloppenberg james t

He was born in 1944. As Kloppenberg rightly notes, Obama like all of us is the product of not simply a history of ideas but also a history of our polity. Examining Obama's views on the Constitution, slavery and the Civil War, the New Deal, and the civil rights movement, Kloppenberg shows Obama's sophisticated understanding of American history. Derided by the Right as dangerous and by the Left as spineless, Barack Obama puzzles observers. He puts his religious views in context, sets them against the beliefs and commitments of others and tries to evaluate them fairly even from his own limited perspective. It has no dogmas, and no doctrines save its method. Reading Obama traces the origins of his ideas and establishes him as the most penetrating political thinker elected to the presidency in the past century.

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